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Tips on Buying Your First Horse

Karyn Malinowski, Ph.D., Dean of Outreach & Extension Programs

Reviewed in 2004 by Carey Williams, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Equine Management

Fact Sheet #167

 

Nothing is more thrilling to a horse lover than the purchase and arrival of one’s first horse. Too often, due to lack of knowledge, this exciting experience can turn into a disaster in a few short weeks.

 


 

Saddling and Bridling Horses Safely

Dawn M. Richard, Graduate Assistant, & Karyn Malinowski, Ph.D., Dean of Outreach & Extension Programs

Reviewed in 2004 by Carey Williams, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Equine Management

Fact Sheet #348

 

Although it is up to the preference of the individual, many riders choose to saddle the horse first and then bridle it. In this way you can still restrain the horse on cross-ties or with the lead while you saddle up. Remember, never tie a horse by the bridle. The horse should be tied while saddling to avoid the chance of it running away with the saddle half cinched.

 


 

Mounting, Dismounting, and Riding Horses Safely

Karyn Malinowski, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Horse Management & Dawn M. Richard, Graduate Assistant

Published 2004

Fact Sheet #349

 

With your horse properly and safely tacked, you are ready to mount, provided you have checked the girth at least twice for tightness. Walk the horse out of the barn with the reins pulled over its head. If the reins are split, lead with the rein on the near (left) side and rest the off-side rein on the horse’s neck. Do not let it drag on the ground. Maintain a slack, but firm hand on the reins even while leading.

 


 

Horse Trailer Maintenance and Trailering Safety

Marjorie R. Margentino, Program Associate in Animal Science; Karyn Malinowski, Ph.D., Director Equine Science Center; and Carey A. Williams, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Equine Management

Published 6/7/2004

Fact Sheet #607

 

Horse owners will usually find it necessary at some point in time to trailer their horses. Trailering may be necessary at time of purchase, for horse shows, trail riding, or a medical emergency.


 

Stress Management for Equine Athletes

Karyn Malinowski, Ph.D., Dean of Outreach & Extension Programs

Reviewed in 2004 by Carey Williams, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Equine Management

Fact Sheet #716

 

It’s hard to imagine that an animal, though it may receive optimal care, can experience psychological stress that ultimately can affect its health. But horses, which can be very "emotional" creatures, are affected by stress, and how each animal responds to a situation differs.

 

 

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© 2009 Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Items may be reprinted with permission from the
Director of the Equine Science Center:

esc@njaes.rutgers.edu


The Equine Science Center is a unit of
Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.